Faculty

Svetlana Boym

Svetlana Boym

Curt Hugo Reisinger Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures and of Comparative Literature
Co-teaching Humanities 51. Major Themes in Humanities: Love and Freedom

Svetlana Boym’s primary areas of teaching and research are aesthetics and philosophy and literature, art and the urban imaginary. She is concerned with the politics of memory, the off-modern condition, relationship between estrangement and exile, art in the public sphere, political and artistic freedom.

Julie A. Buckler

Julie A. Buckler

Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures and of Comparative Literature
Co-teaching Humanities 11c. Frameworks: The Art of Reading

Professor Julie Buckler, in collaboration with Professor Michael Puett, has assumed the leadership of Humanities 11c. Frameworks: The Art of Reading.  Designed as a pathway course for students interested in exploring the arts and humanities, the course introduces "reading" as a wide-ranging practice of interpretation, applicable to social phenomena and historical narratives as well as to literary texts.

Amanda  Claybaugh

Amanda Claybaugh

Professor of English
Teaching in Humanities 10a. The Humanities Colloquium: Essential Works 1

Amanda Claybaugh received her BA in English from Yale University in 1993 and her PhD in English from Harvard University in 2001. After teaching at Columbia University for nine years, she returned to Harvard in 2010. She is on the faculty of the English department, and she is associated with the programs in History and Literature and American Civilization. She also co-organizes the American Literature and Culture seminar at the Mahindra Humanities Center.

Emma Dench

Emma Dench

Professor of Classics and of History
Teaching in Humanities 10b. The Humanities Colloquium, Essential Works 2

Professor Emma Dench will be teaching in the new Humanities Colloquium: Essential Works 2.  She was born in York, England, grew up near Stratford-Upon-Avon, and studied at Wadham College, Oxford (BA Hons Literae Humaniores 1987) and at St. Hugh's College, Oxford (DPhil in Ancient History 1993). Before taking up a joint appointment in the Departments of the Classics and of History at Harvard in January 2007, she taught classics and ancient history at Birkbeck College, University of London.

Niall Ferguson

Niall Ferguson

Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History
Co-Creator of Humanities 52: Empires

Niall Ferguson is Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History . He is also a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.  He has published fourteen books. His first, Paper and Iron: Hamburg Business and German Politics in the Era of Inflation 1897-1927, was short-listed for the History Today Book of the Year award, while the collection of essays he edited, Virtual History: Alternatives and Counterfactuals, was a UK bestseller.

Stephen Greenblatt

Stephen Greenblatt

John Cogan University Professor of the Humanities
Co-Creator of Humanities 10a and 10b. The Humanities Colloquium: Essential Works 1 & 2

Stephen Greenblatt, in collaboration with Louis Menand and other distinguished members of the faculty, is launching this fall an exciting new two-semester Humanities Colloquium entitled Essential Works, Humanities 10a and 10b. While designed as a pathway for students interested in further work in the humanities, all students are welcome. Each each semester is designed as an independent course studying important works of literature, philosophy, and the arts from ancient times to the present. Students can take either semester, or they can take both semesters in whichever order they choose.

Ned Hall

Ned Hall

Professor of Philosophy
Teaching in Humanities 10b. The Humanities Colloquium: Essential Works 2

Ned Hall works mainly on metaphysics and philosophy of science, with a special emphasis on philosophical problems associated with the foundations of quantum physics. In the philosophy of physics, his current research focuses on disentangling the various problems associated with the quantum mechanical treatment of measurement, and on elucidating the implications of and conceptual basis for the usual quantum mechanical description of systems containing identical particles.

John Hamilton

John Hamilton

William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Comparative Literature and of Germanic Languages and Literatures
Co-Creator of Humanities 11b Frameworks: The Art of Looking

Professor John Hamilton is the co-creator, with Alexander Rehding, of Humanities 11b. Frameworks: The Art of Listening.  Designed as a pathway course for students interested in the the study of the humanities, it is also open to all undergraduates intrigued by the possibility of exploring the sonic world.  This year, he will also debut Humanities 51, a new course, taught with Professor Svetlana Boym, called "Love and Freedom".

Maya Jasanoff

Maya Jasanoff

Professor of History
Co-Creator of Humanities 52: Empires

Maya Jasanoff’s teaching and research focus on the history of modern Britain and the British Empire. Her first book, Edge of Empire: Lives, Culture, and Conquest in the East, 1750-1850, investigates British expansion in India and Egypt through the lives of art collectors. It was awarded the 2005 Duff Cooper Prize and was a book of the year selection in numerous publications including The Economist, The Observer, and The Sunday Times

Louis Menand

Louis Menand

Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of English
Co-Creator of Humanities 10a and 10b. The Humanities Colloquium: Essential Works 1 & 2

Louis Menand, in collaboration with Stephen Greenblatt and other distinguished members of the faculty, is launching this fall an exciting new two-semester Humanities Colloquium entitled Essential Works, Humanities 10a and 10b. While designed as a pathway for students interested in further work in the humanities, all students are welcome. Each each semester is designed as an independent course studying important works of literature, philosophy, and the arts from ancient times to the present. Students can take either semester, or they can take both semesters in whichever order they choose. 

Katharina  Piechocki

Katharina Piechocki

Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature
Teaching in Humanities 10b. The Humanities Colloquium: Essential Works 2

Katharina Piechocki (pronounced Pee-ay-HOD-ski) joined the Comparative Literature Department as assistant professor in July 2013. She holds a PhD in Comparative Literature from New York University (2013). Her dissertation titled “Cartographic Humanism: Defining Early Modern Europe, 1500-1550” centers on the definition of Europe’s boundaries in a time, when cartography and translation emerged as crucial humanist practices against the backdrop of new territorial discoveries. She earned her first doctorate in Romance Studies (2009) from Vienna University, Austria.

Michael Puett

Michael Puett

Walter C. Klein Professor of Chinese History in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations
Co-teaching Humanities 11c. Frameworks: The Art of Reading

 Michael Puett, in collaboration with Professor Julie Buckler, has assumed the leadership of Humanities 11c. Frameworks: The Art of Reading.  Designed as a pathway course for students interested in exploring the arts and humanities, the course introduces "reading" as a wide-ranging practice of interpretation, applicable to social phenomena and historical narratives as well as to literary texts.

Jennifer L. Roberts

Jennifer L. Roberts

Elizabeth Cary Agassiz Professor of the Humanities
Co-Creator of Humanities 11a Frameworks: The Art of Looking

Jennifer L. Roberts is the co-creator of Humanities 11a. Frameworks: The Art of Looking. Designed as a pathway course for students interested in the study of the arts and humanities, the course explores the aesthetic, historical, and social intricacy of the visual world.

Jeffrey  T. Schnapp

Jeffrey T. Schnapp

Professor of Romance Languages & Literature and Faculty Director of metaLAB (at) Harvard
Teaching Humanities Studios 3 & 4

Before moving permanently to Harvard in 2011, Jeffrey T. Schnapp occupied the Pierotti Chair of Italian Studies at Stanford, where he founded the Stanford Humanities Lab in 1999.  This year, in collaboration with the metaLAB team, he will be teaching two Humanities Studio Courses: Architectures of the Book: Bookmaking - past, present, future - and The Mixed Reality City.

Alison  Simmons

Alison Simmons

Samuel H. Wolcott Professor of Philosophy
Teaching in Humanities 10a. The Humanities Colloquium: Essential Works 1

Alison Simmons received her Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1994. The bulk of her teaching is in early modern philosophy, natural philosophy, and theories of mind. She also has teaching interests, however, in medieval philosophy, philosophy of mind, and philosophy of psychology.